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Since 2007 we have assisted more than 115 asylum seekers. Many cases are still pending but 34 have been granted asylum.
3 asylees have become US citizens! We support asylum seekers until they get a work permit and can support themselves.
We are currently supporting 14 in Worcester.

Tuesday November 29 is Giving Tuesday!

Put your money where your heart is.
Help save an LGBTQ asylum seeker today.



valentine

Dear caring friend of LGBT Asylum Seekers,


Global events are forcing more asylum seekers to flee unbearable conditions in their home countries.

Many governments have stepped up persecution of their LGBTQ citizens. These past few months, the Task Force has had more urgent requests for help than ever before.

Thanks to YOU, we have been able to say “Yes” to many who knock on our door,including Kamelliah and Ian.

From Fear to Freedom: Kamelliah’s story

My name is Kamelliah. My passion for creative writing, photography, and psychology are as much a part of me, as being a 20 year old ex-Muslim lesbian. I was raised in Saudi Arabia, where homosexuality, and autonomy for women, are forbidden by law…

READ MORE of Kamelliah’s personal journey here

“Phoning for Godot”: Ian’s story

Ian escaped Uganda after his boyfriend and father were murdered. He arrived knowing no one, but with the name, address, and phone number of a man “who will help you if you need it” in his pocket. Ian waited for hours in the cold and dark, calling and calling...

READ MORE of Ian’s personal journey here

Your special “New beginnings” gift today will help another asylum seeker like Kamelliah or Ian.



Thank you for all you do! YOU make a difference in the lives of asylum seekers. valentine

LGBT Asylum seekers need our help!


You can stand up for Justice and Human Rights today!

Bonnie is a slender, small-boned young Ugandan woman with big dark eyes and a gentle personality. When she was just 13 years old, her family learned she was a lesbian and handed her over to an uncle to “cure her of her evil tendencies.” His method: repeated rapes and beatings. When Bonnie still continued to love her girlfriend, her family married her off to a man who raped and beat her for 3 solid years. Bonnie finally escaped her family and the homophobia of Uganda, and made it to America. Bonnie is deeply thankful to have found a warm welcome with the LGBT Asylum Support Task Force, which is helping her to secure shelter, food, and medical and mental health care after all she has been through. Now, for the first time in years, she can let down her guard and not expect to be raped.

Thanks to you, Bonnie has hope for her future.

It costs the Task Force over $9,000 a month to support Bonnie and 11 other LGBT asylum seekers. Three more asylum seekers like Bonnie need your help today so we can take them off the streets and get them safe. Your gift today will give them a roof over their head and clothes for our New England winter.

Donate

Learn more by coming to our next monthly volunteer meeting,
second Mondays, 6:00pm
at Hadwen Park Church, 6 Clover St., Worcester.

For more info email info@lgbtasylum.org

Did You Know...

There are laws against homosexuality in 87 88 countries around the world?
In 72 countries, you could be imprisoned if you are part of the LGBT community?
In 7 of those countries, the punishment is the death penalty?
In some of those countries "corrective rape" is common and sometimes committed by government officials?

Fortunately, There is Help

The LGBT Asylum Support Task Force is a group of dedicated volunteers in Central Massachusetts who provide support those for who are seeking political asylum in the U.S. based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. Since 2007, the Task Force has helped more than 100 individuals.

Asylum seekers are vulnerable and traumatized individuals who have fled to the U.S. in fear of being killed or harmed in their countries of origin due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. The violence resulting from homophobia and anti-homosexuality laws in many countries in the world is rampant.

Because most asylum seekers are not permitted to work during their legal process, they do not have the means to support themselves. They often arrive in the U.S. with nothing but the clothes on their backs having used all of their resources getting here. Moreover, they remain particularly isolated because frequently they cannot turn to people from their own country in the U.S. for assistance or support as it is their fellow countrymen from whom they are fleeing.

The volunteers of LGBT Asylum Support Task Force contribute to the financial, housing, social, and spiritual needs of asylum seekers in many ways:

raising money to help pay rent and bills,
recruiting volunteers to host asylum seekers to live in their homes,
donating clothing, toiletries, and household items,
driving them to appointments, and
providing a safe and supportive social environment.

This is often the first time they have been able to publicly express their sexual orientation and it is incredibly empowering. For many, this is the first time they have been able to witness same sex couples and families living normal everyday lives and it gives them great hope for their futures.

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